EMS Week

Use this toolkit of ideas to kick-start, or supplement, your EMS Week plans.

Elderly Outreach – An Essential Part of EMS Week

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Nationwide, seniors are one of the largest consumers of emergency and prehospital healthcare. Almost 16 million Americans aged 65 and older visited a hospital emergency room in 2004, and these older Americans made up one-third of all ambulance transports, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Seniors can benefit greatly from outreach and education during EMS Week.

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Use Your Brain to Cook Up Some EMS Week Fun

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Looking for finger foods for your open house? There’s no better way to interest older kids and teenagers in EMS than to gross them out. With gelatin brains, hearts and eyeballs, kids can hold a life-giving organ in their own hands – albeit a slippery, slimy, inanimate one. These “ick”-inducing foods and drinks will indulge kids’ senses, while teaching them about their bodies and acquainting them with EMS.

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Tips on Hosting a Successful Open House

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One of the best ways to invite the public to learn about your EMS agency is by hosting an open house. Children, adults and seniors are curious about EMS, and many people would love a chance to meet their local EMTs and paramedics and take a peek inside the ambulance. Here are some tips to help you host a successful open house for EMS Week.

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Have a Heart for Senior Citizens

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February is, of course, when Americans celebrate Valentine’s Day, which makes it a perfect month to focus your outreach efforts on heart health. February is also the American Heart Association’s Heart Health Month, so EMS agencies have a natural ally with which to partner, plan and execute heart-health promotions.

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50 Years and Millions of Trained Citizens Later… CPR Connects EMS to the Community

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It was 1960. John F. Kennedy was running for president. Xerox introduced the first paper copy machine. Khrushchev pounded his shoe at the United Nations. And across the country, coronary artery disease had reached epidemic levels. Many men in their 50s and 60s were heart attacks waiting to happen. They smoked, didn’t exercise and ate lots of red meat and foods high in saturated fats. (If you weren’t around then, think “Mad Men.”) Many had uncontrolled high blood pressure. Cholesterol-lowering statins had not yet arrived on the scene.

So it was fortuitous, and a bit ironic, that the year coronary artery disease peaked also marked the birth of modern CPR.

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